Aging Matters | Aging & the Workplace

Since 2011, it is estimated that 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day in the United States. That trend will continue for the next decade. At the same time, we are living longer than ever before.  Experts project that by 2020, there will be more Americans over aged 65 than children under the age of 5, an unprecedented milestone in human history. By 2050, the number of Americans over the age of 65 will nearly double what it is today.     

The aging of our population will impact every aspect of our lives. In this edition of Aging Matters, we will look at one – work, and explore what effects an aging demographic will have on our lives on the job.

What can we expect in the coming decades?  How will the aging of America impact the workplace? What should employers be doing now to adapt and prepare for the future? What will the workforce of tomorrow look like? 

There are lots of questions, but one thing is certain, change is coming. Join us on April 27, at 8:00pm as we explore Aging & The Workplace.

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Aging & the Workplace | The Experts

Aging & the Workplace | The Experts

The Experts


Statistics Explained

Since 2011, it is estimated that 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day in the United States.  That trend will continue for the next decade.  At the same time, we are living longer than ever before.  Experts project that by 2020, there will be more Americans over aged 65 than children under the age of 5, an unprecedented milestone in human history.   By 2050, the number of Americans over the age of 65 will nearly double what it is today.
Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, U.S. CENSUS BUREAU census.gov; An Aging Nation: The Older Population in the United States [link]


In general, the technology sector is booming, lots of jobs, but not always enough workers to fill those jobs.  In subsets like the radio frequency industry, there are questions about who will do the work of tomorrow.
Source: Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), Professional and Technical Services Industry Report: Preparing for an Aging Workforce [link]


The average age of a worker in the US is 42.  The average age of a broadcast engineer is 54.
Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Division of Labor Force Statistics, Current Population Survey (CPS) [link


The US Department of Labor projects that in the next decade, health care related industries will claim nine of the top-twenty fastest growing sectors of our economy.  The top five will all be health related fields.  Many of those employers will be looking for nurses.
Source: U.S. Bureau Of Labor Statistics, Monthly Labor Review, December 2015, Industry Employment and Output Projections to 2024  [link]


During the early 2000’s, nursing schools across the country took on the challenge of a potential nursing shortage.  They grew nursing programs, boosted enrollment and rolled out a PR campaign that nursing was a solid career choice for anyone, women and men.   But recruiting new nurses isn’t enough.
Source: DesRoches and Robert Dittus, Peter I. Buerhaus, Karen Donelan, Beth T. Ulrich, Linda Norman, Catherine, Perspectives; Impact Of The Nurse Shortage On Hospital Patient Care: Comparative doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.26.3.85326, no.3 (2007):853-862Health Affairs [link]


Sometimes retirement is not an option.  While it came with a fair amount of stress and uncertainty, the economic recession of 2008 jump started a trend of working longer in the US.   Retirement funds evaporated as did home values across the country, leaving fewer opportunities to retire.
Source: The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research; Working Longer: The Disappearing Divide between Work Life and Retirement [link]